Thanks for stopping by for Day 23 of Upworthy’s 31 Days of Happiness Countdown! If this is your first visit, here’s the gist: Each day between Dec. 1 and Dec. 31, we’re sharing stories we hope will bring joy, smiles, and laughter into our lives and yours. It’s been a challenging year for a lot of us, so why not end it on a high note, with a bit of happiness? Check back tomorrow (or click the links at the bottom) for another installment!

In the months between Halloween and Valentine’s Day, candy is never far from my mind.

Eating it. Buying it. Gifting it.  Finding it in the bottom of fireplace socks. (How weird of a tradition is that?)

But despite my not-so-secret dream to give it all up and go to pastry school, I never gave much thought to how candy, specifically chocolate, is mass-produced.

The tiny, delicate chocolates on Great British Baking Show or Zumbo’s Just Desserts, sure. But the millions of boxed chocolates produced by Russell Stover or See’s? How on Earth do they keep up? And how do they get all of those creamy fillings inside?

The answer, like the smooth milk chocolate itself, is incredibly satisfying.

This wordless video by the National Film Board of Canada reveals how delicious chocolates get their centers. It is hypnotic, mouthwatering, and informative in equal measure — which is pretty much all you can ask for in a video.

And if you don’t believe me on that mouthwatering part, let these borderlinepornographic GIFs do the talking.

First, you need to get that milk going.

Then twist and turn the chocolate … as one does.

Prepare your fillings. This one has cashews.

Allow the fillings to be draped in chocolate. I’ve never wanted to be a cashew so bad in my life.

Then fill ’em up, just for good measure.

And finally, roll ’em out.

To see more footage of this intoxicating process, watch the video in its entirety.

Bonus points if you make up your own dialogue. The National Film Board of Canada is basically asking for it.


More days of happiness here: DAY 1 / DAY 2 / DAY 3 / DAY 4 / DAY 5/ DAY 6 / DAY 7 / DAY 8 / DAY 9 / DAY 10 / DAY 11 / DAY 12 / DAY 13 / DAY 14 / DAY 15 / DAY 16 / DAY 17 / DAY 18 / DAY 19 / DAY 20 / DAY 21 / DAY 22 / [DAY 23]/ DAY 24 / DAY 25 / DAY 26 / DAY 27 / DAY 28 / DAY 29 / DAY 30 / DAY 31

Read more: www.upworthy.com